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The Empuls Glossary

Glossary of Human Resources Management and Employee Benefit Terms

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Relieving Letter

A relieving letter is a formal document issued by an employer to an employee confirming that they have completed their employment tenure with the company and their resignation has been accepted. 

It serves as proof that the employee has left their previous employment on good terms and is often required by future employers as evidence of the employee's work experience. 

A relieving letter typically includes the employee's name, job title, duration of employment, last working day, and confirmation that the employee has resigned and the resignation has been accepted.

What is a relieving letter?

A relieving letter is a formal document issued by an employer to an employee confirming that they have completed their employment tenure with the company and their resignation has been accepted. It usually includes the last working day, the employee's job title, and the duration of their employment.

Why is a relieving letter important?

A relieving letter is important for several reasons. Firstly, it serves as proof that the employee has completed their employment tenure with the company and that their resignation has been accepted. It is often required by future employers as evidence of the employee's work experience and to ensure that they have left their previous employment on good terms.

Secondly, a relieving letter may include information about any outstanding dues or benefits owed to the employee, such as unpaid salary, bonuses, or leave encashment. This can help the employee to ensure that they receive all the compensation they are entitled to.

Finally, a relieving letter can help to protect the employer from any potential legal disputes that may arise in the future. By issuing a relieving letter, the employer can provide clear documentation of the employee's resignation and the terms of their departure, which can help to prevent any misunderstandings or disputes.

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When should an employee receive a relieving letter?

An employee should receive a relieving letter on their last working day or within a few days of their last working day. In some cases, it may take longer if the employer needs to complete any formalities, such as clearing pending dues or conducting an exit interview.

What should a relieving letter include?

A relieving letter should include the employee's name, job title, duration of employment, last working day, and confirmation that the employee has resigned and the resignation has been accepted. It may also include information on any outstanding dues or benefits owed to the employee.

Can an employee request a relieving letter?

Yes, an employee can request a relieving letter from their employer if they have not received one after their last working day. Employers are legally obligated to issue a relieving letter to employees who have resigned, and it is the employee's right to receive one.

What should an employee do if they do not receive a relieving letter?

If an employee does not receive a relieving letter, they should contact their employer and request one. If the employer still does not provide the relieving letter, the employee can file a complaint with the labor commissioner or seek legal action.

Can an employer refuse to issue a relieving letter?

No, an employer cannot refuse to issue a relieving letter to an employee who has resigned, provided that the employee has completed all formalities and cleared all dues. Refusing to issue a relieving letter can be considered a violation of labor laws and can result in legal action against the employer.

How important is a relieving letter for future employment?

A relieving letter is an essential document for future employment, as it serves as proof of the employee's previous work experience and confirms that they left their previous employment on good terms. It may be required by future employers as a mandatory document when applying for a new job.

When should an employee receive a relieving letter?

An employee should receive a relieving letter when they resign from their job or when their employment contract comes to an end. A relieving letter is a formal document that confirms the employee's resignation and serves as proof that they have completed all of their obligations to the company.

The relieving letter typically includes the following information:

  1. Employee details: The employee's name, job title, and employment dates.
  2. Resignation confirmation: The letter should confirm that the employee has resigned from their job and that the resignation has been accepted by the company.
  3. Notice period: The letter should specify the notice period served by the employee, and confirm that all obligations during the notice period have been fulfilled.
  4. Final settlement: The letter should confirm that all dues payable to the employee, including salary, reimbursements, and any other entitlements, have been settled.
  5. Non-disclosure agreement: The letter should include a non-disclosure agreement, which prohibits the employee from disclosing confidential information about the company.

It is important to issue the relieving letter promptly after an employee's departure to avoid any confusion or disputes. The employee can use the relieving letter as proof of their employment history and to support their job applications in the future.

How to write relieving letter?

Here is a basic format and guidelines for writing a relieving letter:

  1. Start with a heading that includes the company's name, address, and the date.
  2. Address the letter to the employee who is leaving the company, and begin with a polite greeting.
  3. Mention the employee's name, designation, and employment dates in the first paragraph.
  4. Confirm the employee's resignation and acceptance by the company. Also, mention the date on which the resignation was accepted.
  5. Specify the notice period served by the employee and confirm that all obligations during the notice period have been fulfilled.
  6. Confirm that all dues payable to the employee, including salary, reimbursements, and any other entitlements, have been settled. Mention the amount of any outstanding payments or reimbursements, if any.
  7. Include a non-disclosure agreement, which prohibits the employee from disclosing confidential information about the company.
  8. End the letter with a polite and encouraging note, wishing the employee success in their future endeavors.
  9. Close the letter with a complimentary close, such as "Sincerely" or "Best regards," followed by the name and signature of the authorized signatory.

Here's an example:

[Company Name and Address]

[Date]

[Employee Name and Address]

Dear [Employee Name],

This is to confirm that we have received your resignation letter dated [Date]. We are accepting your resignation and relieving you from the services of the company effective from [Date of relieving].

We acknowledge the notice period served by you and confirm that all obligations during the notice period have been fulfilled. Further, we are pleased to confirm that all dues payable to you, including salary, reimbursements, and any other entitlements, have been settled in full.

As a reminder, we request you to respect the confidentiality of any sensitive information related to the company that you may have access to during your employment period.

We appreciate your contributions and hard work during your tenure with our company and wish you all the success in your future endeavors.

Sincerely,

[Authorized Signatory]

[Company Name]

Employee pulse surveys:

These are short surveys that can be sent frequently to check what your employees think about an issue quickly. The survey comprises fewer questions (not more than 10) to get the information quickly. These can be administered at regular intervals (monthly/weekly/quarterly).

One-on-one meetings:

Having periodic, hour-long meetings for an informal chat with every team member is an excellent way to get a true sense of what’s happening with them. Since it is a safe and private conversation, it helps you get better details about an issue.

eNPS:

eNPS (employee Net Promoter score) is one of the simplest yet effective ways to assess your employee's opinion of your company. It includes one intriguing question that gauges loyalty. An example of eNPS questions include: How likely are you to recommend our company to others? Employees respond to the eNPS survey on a scale of 1-10, where 10 denotes they are ‘highly likely’ to recommend the company and 1 signifies they are ‘highly unlikely’ to recommend it.

Based on the responses, employees can be placed in three different categories:

  • Promoters
    Employees who have responded positively or agreed.
  • Detractors
    Employees who have reacted negatively or disagreed.
  • Passives
    Employees who have stayed neutral with their responses.

Is relieving letter and experience letter the same?

No, a relieving letter and an experience letter are not the same.

A relieving letter is a formal document issued by an employer to an employee who has resigned or whose employment contract has ended. It confirms that the employee has been relieved from their duties and responsibilities and has completed all obligations during the notice period. It also confirms that all dues payable to the employee, including salary and reimbursements, have been settled.

On the other hand, an experience letter is a formal document issued by an employer to an employee, usually at the time of resignation or termination. It outlines the employee's work experience with the company and provides details of their job responsibilities, work ethics, and achievements. It may also include information on the employee's performance and conduct during their tenure with the company.

How to ask for relieving letter?

Here are some steps you can take to request a relieving letter from your employer:

  1. Schedule a meeting: Set up a meeting with your HR manager or immediate supervisor to discuss your request for a relieving letter. It is best to do this in person or over a phone call.
  2. Explain your reason: Explain why you need a relieving letter and how it will benefit you in your future career prospects. Be professional and courteous in your approach.
  3. Provide details: Provide your employment details, including your name, job title, employment dates, and notice period served, to help the employer identify your records.
  4. Follow up: If you don't hear back from your employer, follow up with them via email or phone call to remind them about your request.
  5. Be patient: It may take some time for your employer to process your request and issue a relieving letter. Be patient, and if necessary, politely follow up with them to ensure that your request is being processed.
  6. Acknowledge receipt: Once you receive the relieving letter, acknowledge receipt by sending a thank-you email or note to your employer.

Remember that a relieving letter is a formal document, and it is important to request it in a professional and courteous manner. It is also advisable to request the letter as soon as possible after your employment contract comes to an end.

Can I get relieving letter without serving a notice period

It is unlikely that you can get a relieving letter without serving the notice period as mentioned in your employment contract or as mutually agreed with your employer.

The notice period is a contractual obligation that both the employer and the employee have agreed upon. 

If you do not serve the notice period, you may be in breach of your employment contract, and your employer may refuse to issue a relieving letter or provide a negative reference. In some cases, your employer may also hold back your salary or other benefits until you serve the notice period.

What to do if the company is not giving relieving letter

If your company is not giving you a relieving letter, here are some steps you can take:

  1. Contact HR: Contact the HR department and inquire about the status of your relieving letter. Ask if there are any outstanding dues or issues that need to be addressed before the letter can be issued.
  2. Follow up: If you do not hear back from HR, follow up with them via email or phone call to remind them about your request.
  3. Consult legal help: If the company still refuses to issue the relieving letter, you may consider seeking legal help. Consult a lawyer or a legal advisor to understand your legal options and the best course of action.
  4. Consider alternate documents: If you are unable to obtain a relieving letter, you can consider using other documents to prove your employment, such as your offer letter, appointment letter, or salary slips.

It is important to note that a relieving letter is a formal document that serves as proof of your employment and can be helpful in your future career prospects. Therefore, it is in your best interest to try and obtain the relieving letter from your company.

Can terminate employee get relieving letter

Typically, a terminated employee is not eligible to receive a relieving letter, as this letter is issued to employees who have voluntarily resigned and completed their notice period as per their employment contract or as mutually agreed with the employer.

However, in some cases, employers may choose to issue a relieving letter to terminated employees as a gesture of goodwill or to help them in their future job search. This decision ultimately depends on the company's policies and the reasons for termination.

If you have been terminated and you are unsure whether you are eligible to receive a relieving letter, it is best to contact your HR department and inquire about the company's policies on issuing relieving letters to terminated employees.

How to write a mail asking for relieving letter?

Here is a sample email you can use to request a relieving letter from your employer:

Subject: Request for relieving letter

Dear [Employer/HR Department],

I hope this email finds you well. I am writing to request a relieving letter as I have recently completed my notice period and have officially resigned from my position at [Company Name].

I would like to request the letter at your earliest convenience as it is an important document that I may require for future employment opportunities. I have fulfilled all my responsibilities and duties to the best of my ability and would appreciate your cooperation in issuing the relieving letter promptly.

Please let me know if there are any further formalities or dues that need to be completed before the relieving letter can be issued. I am available to discuss any concerns or questions you may have.

Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

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